Waupaca Foundry donates certified OSHA 10 training to community

Participants of The Refuge receive safety training and job skills through a workforce development program hosted by Cleveland State Community College

At Waupaca Foundry our commitment to safety doesn’t stop when the work day ends—we also invest in building a safe workforce outside of our iron casting manufacturing and machining plants. Program participants of The Refuge, in Cleveland, Tennessee recently got some needed job training thanks to team members at our Etowah, Tenn. ductile iron casting foundry. Gordon Michaud, who is a maintenance department training coordinator, volunteered his time to teach OSHA 10 classes to program participants through partnership with OneSource Workforce Development of Cleveland State Community College.

The OSHA 10 training is general industry focused and teaches participants basic information about on the job safety for work in an industrial setting. Program participants were identified through Cleveland, Tennessee’s 503c charitable organization, The Refuge, which offers access to resources, information and opportunity so that those who find themselves in difficult economic or social situations may move from need to sustainability.

“Education and training build sustainability for those who seek it out and follow through”, Gordon said. He has been an OSHA certified trainer since November of 2016 and donated his time with the support of team leaders at the Etowah-based ductile iron plant. “The training provides entry level general industry workers’ safety information so people with no experience in an industrial setting have the information needed to help them work safely in an industrial field,” he said. In addition to safety training, participants in the program are also learning welding in hopes of being better positioned to get a job.

For Gordon, he said volunteering his time is an opportunity to help people who have faced adversity and disadvantages in their lives. Before working in Etowah, he worked at Waupaca Foundry's Marinette ductile iron plant where he was a member of the rescue squad and a community volunteer.

“We have great people who work hard every day,” said Sam Greene, plant manager. “We support their efforts to volunteer in our community. Our organization is successful thanks to our work force so it’s our turn to help the community where we can.”

Waupaca Foundry donated the cost of training for 20 participants.